Hi. I'm a stay-at-home mom—when I'm not working. I work 'gigs' as an on-site kids sports photographer, so definitely not a 9-to-5. I've gotta say, being a full-time parent is by far the most challenging and most fulfilling job I have ever had.

Mae's daddy was laid off a couple months ago. It is so nice to have him back home from those business trips, but in the meantime... eek!

My super-awesome kid, Mae Beatrix, was born on January 19, 2010. If you have any questions, feel free to ask!

 

I just realized…

Next month is when I was planning on conceiving again. It felt like ages away when I originally planned it. But here it is, and Mae is 2 years and 4 months old, almost. She’ll be ready to be a big sister soon. It’s easy to talk, but I’m realizing how scary it is actually planning a child. We didn’t plan Mae. Honestly, that’s easier! Ha ha.
I told Joe as soon as he finds a job we can start looking at houses & have another kid. I just don’t want to be in my 3rd trimester in the Arizona summer, hence the planning.

I have to share this. This is Mae when she was just a few weeks old, I think. You can see why I instantly fell in love with this child.

I have to share this. This is Mae when she was just a few weeks old, I think. You can see why I instantly fell in love with this child.

Mae got this adorable hat from her uncle Bobby yesterday. She also got some perfect Osh Kosh overalls, I have to post a picture of those, too!

Mae got this adorable hat from her uncle Bobby yesterday. She also got some perfect Osh Kosh overalls, I have to post a picture of those, too!

meandmoh:

sayholalola:

Lola’s prognosis with West Syndrome is good because we caught it so early. Within 10 - 12 days of the seizures (unknown that they were seizures at that time), we had Lola seen by a neurologist and she was put on medication. Because we were diligent parents and because we had doctors that believed us, Lola will hopefully go on to live a normal life. But there are horror stories where parents were sent home after being told their baby only had colic or gas. This makes me physically ill to think about. Every day that a child goes without a diagnosis can cause catastrophic damage to their tiny, delicate brain.

So please watch this video. Remember what the seizures look like. Pass this site around to parents with young children. Reblog it. The chances of a child having West Syndrome is 1 in 3500. It may be considered “rare”, but we never thought we would have a child with West Syndrome. We had never even heard of West Syndrome. You never think things like this will happen to your child, but they can and they do. Yet if parents, family members or friends know what the seizures look like than that could be valuable time to get that child diagnosed and treated.

If you think your child may be having seizures than call your pediatrician immediately or go to the emergency room. And bring proof. Make sure you take a video of what you think may be seizures. You certainly don’t want to be told it’s nothing which is why proof is essential. West Syndrome is a serious condition, but a child has a greater chance of coming out with minor damage if it is caught early.

Pass this around.

**The video says “Part I”, but the other videos of Lola’s seizures can be found on our YouTube channel.

http://www.youtube.com/user/sayholalola

 I would have never considered this a “seizure” had I not viewed this.  This is important for parents to see so they can recognize what a seizure in an infant might look like.  Please pass this along.

Wow. What a beautiful baby. I’m so glad there are diligent parents like these who investigate things like this.

Crazy genius baby.

Today, changing Mae’s poo-poo diaper, I folded it up and was putting her new diaper on. She said something that sounded like, “I do it,” and grabbed for the folded-up dirty diaper. I wasn’t sure if she was just making noises or meant to say that. (So far she’s just been saying single words to identify objects, for the most part.)

I said, “You can’t have your dirty diaper, silly. It’s icky.”

Then she said again, “Mama, I do it. Trash.” Sure enough, when I pulled her off the changing table and set her on the floor, she ran with that diaper over to the Diaper Champ, put it in and closed the hatch!

OMIGOSH. What?! You are too young to be doing this! She is only 19 months old. She surprises me every day with her exponentially growing vocabulary and thought process.

Later today, we went to a convenience store for a couple of things. I handed Mae a bottle of V8 from the refreshments fridge, and she immediately ran to the register with it, holding it up to the lady. She picks up so much, I don’t even realize it. No one is teaching her these things. She just learns. It’s baffling sometimes.

My little baby is growing up so freakin’ fast, and it is awesome.

Mae

I made a sign. It’s a bit on the kitschy side, but it’ll do.

I made a sign. It’s a bit on the kitschy side, but it’ll do.

I need to get one of these. But maybe change it to “Baby sleeping. Go away.”
Just now a guy rang the doorbell a couple of minutes after Mae finally quieted down. Our dog Lita started barking her head off. He wouldn’t stop ringing the doorbell! I cracked the door open and before I could even tell him my baby was sleeping, he launched into his sell, talking LOUDLY.
I whispered, “My baby JUST fell asleep, maybe you can come back some other time. It’s just not a good time right now.”
He then PROCEEDED to continue with his sell, in an obnoxiously loud whisper (did he think I was lying to him?), asking me pointless questions like what does my husband do for a living, what do I do for a living (uhhh, stay home with the baby?!), when we moved here, were we born here, etc.
He started getting nosy about our personal finances (he works with some sort of investment firm), and I flat-out told him we just don’t have anything to invest right now. We literally have to count coins to go see a movie or eat out.
THEN he asked if he could call us sometime. Yeah, right. Give my number out? I don’t think so. I said, “No, but if you just give me your information, I’m sure I can find a better time to talk if we need to.”
Sometimes I kick myself for being too polite.
So, Ian Durnan, phone number (602) 507-0409, guess who won’t be utilizing your services at Edward Jones? That’s right. That will teach you.
Miraculously, Mae did not wake up. Although a small part of me wishes that she had, so then he would (might) feel bad.

I need to get one of these. But maybe change it to “Baby sleeping. Go away.”

Just now a guy rang the doorbell a couple of minutes after Mae finally quieted down. Our dog Lita started barking her head off. He wouldn’t stop ringing the doorbell! I cracked the door open and before I could even tell him my baby was sleeping, he launched into his sell, talking LOUDLY.

I whispered, “My baby JUST fell asleep, maybe you can come back some other time. It’s just not a good time right now.”

He then PROCEEDED to continue with his sell, in an obnoxiously loud whisper (did he think I was lying to him?), asking me pointless questions like what does my husband do for a living, what do I do for a living (uhhh, stay home with the baby?!), when we moved here, were we born here, etc.

He started getting nosy about our personal finances (he works with some sort of investment firm), and I flat-out told him we just don’t have anything to invest right now. We literally have to count coins to go see a movie or eat out.

THEN he asked if he could call us sometime. Yeah, right. Give my number out? I don’t think so. I said, “No, but if you just give me your information, I’m sure I can find a better time to talk if we need to.”

Sometimes I kick myself for being too polite.

So, Ian Durnan, phone number (602) 507-0409, guess who won’t be utilizing your services at Edward Jones? That’s right. That will teach you.

Miraculously, Mae did not wake up. Although a small part of me wishes that she had, so then he would (might) feel bad.

Swimming Lessons

Yesterday Mae had her first swimming lesson. She’s the youngest of 5 kids—the oldest is 4, and the next youngest is 2. The lessons are hosted at a parent’s house, in their backyard pool.
At eighteen months old, Mae has not had much exposure to structure, instructions, or rules.
She started the lesson wanting to jump and splash in the pool (she thinks she can swim—she can’t), paying no attention to anyone else. She had no idea anything else was expected of her. By the end of the lesson, she was (for the most part) actually sitting quietly and paying attention to what was going on around her, slowly picking up the structure around her.
The other kids’ parents stay inside the house during the approximately 2-hour class.
I am helping my friend and her sister teach the classes, as their other teachers/assistants bailed on them. It adds a slight hindrance to Mae’s learning process, because she keeps seeing me and expecting me to be right there for her. She’ll get over this pretty quickly, though, I’m sure. I just have to make sure I distance myself from her a bit.
She is the only kid that really seems to want to swim. The other younger kids are scared and hate going under the water, and the two-year-old girl clings and cries.
I am so glad that Mae has this opportunity to learn how to swim. In Arizona, children drown so often because there are so many pools here, and not enough kids are taught to swim at a young age. I’m also glad that Mae has this opportunity to learn structure and listening skills.
I think these lessons only go for two weeks, 4 days a week. There may be more later, though. Baby & toddler swimming lessons are so expensive, we would not be able to afford it otherwise. Honestly, I would be happy if my only payment for this job was free lessons for Mae.

I get the BabyCenter weekly email with tips and facts for Mae’s age that week. It is very informational, and I usually read most of the articles to which they provide links.

But why oh why do they suggest giving my seventeen-month-old a sandwich, or a bowl of cereal with milk, or a glass of juice?

You know what would happen if I did that? Mayhem, that’s what.

She still turns the spoon upside-down when she feeds herself. She would dump that glass of juice right on the floor. And conventional sandwiches turn into floor decor the second she gets her hands on them.

And she’s advanced for her age!

Yesterday evening, I dropped Mae off at my parents, so my dad could keep an eye on her while my mom helped me clean my house. Not too long afterwards, we got a phone call. Mae had pulled a mug of boiling hot water off the counter while my dad’s back was turned, and spilled it on herself.

We called 911 and took an ambulance to the burn unit in Phoenix. She has second-degree burns on her chest, and some on her face. She was screaming and thrashing the entire time, so they couldn’t take her vitals even once, though they tried many times.

Right now she is sleeping restlessly with a medicated second-skin wrap and a bit of Tylenol with codeine in her system. We will be back at the burn unit bright and early this morning to see if she will heal properly with the current treatment. Otherwise, it’s going to get a lot less fun.

Joe and I are taking shifts—I’m supposed to be sleeping right now—to keep an eye on her and keep her face from drying out with ointment.

My dad feels so awful. There’s not much I can do for him in this situation except continue talking to him, comforting him, and assuring him that it’s not his fault. I saw him crying down the hall at the hospital. This whole situation just breaks my heart.

Mae is in so much pain, I can tell. Both Joe and I have suffered from burns ourselves, and I know the intense prickling, stabbing pain she must be feeling. Especially on her poor little nipple!

At least Joe has today off of work… it’s our anniversary. Oh well, we’ll have another one next year.

Yesterday evening, I dropped Mae off at my parents, so my dad could keep an eye on her while my mom helped me clean my house. Not too long afterwards, we got a phone call. Mae had pulled a mug of boiling hot water off the counter while my dad’s back was turned, and spilled it on herself.

We called 911 and took an ambulance to the burn unit in Phoenix. She has second-degree burns on her chest, and some on her face. She was screaming and thrashing the entire time, so they couldn’t take her vitals even once, though they tried many times.

Right now she is sleeping restlessly with a medicated second-skin wrap and a bit of Tylenol with codeine in her system. We will be back at the burn unit bright and early this morning to see if she will heal properly with the current treatment. Otherwise, it’s going to get a lot less fun.

Joe and I are taking shifts—I’m supposed to be sleeping right now—to keep an eye on her and keep her face from drying out with ointment.

My dad feels so awful. There’s not much I can do for him in this situation except continue talking to him, comforting him, and assuring him that it’s not his fault. I saw him crying down the hall at the hospital. This whole situation just breaks my heart.

Mae is in so much pain, I can tell. Both Joe and I have suffered from burns ourselves, and I know the intense prickling, stabbing pain she must be feeling. Especially on her poor little nipple!

At least Joe has today off of work… it’s our anniversary. Oh well, we’ll have another one next year.